PTV Visum 15 sets new standards in multimodality

Thinking Cities
By Thinking Cities September 7, 2015 13:01

PTV Visum 15 sets new standards in multimodality

PTV Visum 15, the new release of PTV’s transport planning software sets new standards in multimodality and allows even more sustainable transport planning.

Decision-makers in many places make it their duty to improve the accessibility of public transport. The supply of Park & Ride (P+R) has a role to play in this. To allow users to accurately analyse the demand, quantity and placement of P+R sites, there are new functions available in PTV Visum 15. “Thanks to these, it is possible to evaluate the existing and future capacities of the P+R sites”, says Dr.-Ing. Johannes Schlaich, Director Traffic Software Product Management & Services at PTV Group.

Some transport just works differently – whereas car drivers tend to prefer direct, more cost-effective routes, cyclists enjoy circumnavigating overly strenuous or dangerous routes: research results suggest that e.g. the maximum slope along the whole path has a significant influence on cyclists’ path choice. “To allow our users to model these events realistically, we have enhanced the stochastic assignment so that path-level impedance elements can now be reflected in the path choice “, explains Schlaich. Another notable use case: freight traffic in which certain components of the cost functions depend on the travel distance.

The new “tour-based freight” module now closes the gap between private and commercial transport. This is a new demand model, specially tailored to logistical needs in an urban context. Thanks to the new module, users can now integrate relevant logistics concepts into their strategic traffic models. The new module is based on the Savings Algorithm applied in the logistics sector, in which potential cost savings are evaluated by creating tours and defining their internal order. “In PTV Visum, the Savings Algorithm ensures that the order matrices calculated by the generation and distribution step are converted into trip matrices, which take into account connection trips with different levels of tour optimization in addition to outgoing and incoming trips”, says Schlaich.

Furthermore, the scenario management has been refined to enable teams to collaborate even more closely. It is now easier for planners to exchange projects with one another and to use password verification. They can also make their work visible externally. “Using the new General Transit Feed Export (GTFS), planners can share their data with the general public via Google Maps or with other planning systems using the GTFS as exchange format,” explains Schlaich. “How much they wish to publish is up to them.” In this way, planners can share certain parts of their public transport network – without losing the ownership of their data.

Thinking Cities
By Thinking Cities September 7, 2015 13:01