Seattle’s first TransitScreen unveiled

Thinking Cities
By Thinking Cities November 11, 2014 10:08

Seattle’s first TransitScreen unveiled

The City of Seattle recently unveiled Seattle’s first TransitScreen, an in-lobby display that shows real-time travel information for bus, light-rail, bikeshare and carshare. Located in the Seattle Municipal Tower’s lobby, the new service helps travellers make better decisions by highlighting all transportation options in close proximity to the building. The Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) and TransitScreen have also announced a pilot public/private partnership to install ten screens in Seattle.

“We’re leveraging technology to make information about transportation more readily available,” said SDOT Director Scott Kubly. “By streaming information about nearby choices into building lobbies, we can make it easier for people to travel around Seattle.”

The screen makes multi-modal travel information more accessible, viewable and engaging so that travellers have real-time information about the best way to reach their destination. Other Seattle organizations are also embracing this technology. Screens for Seattle Children’s Hospital will be operational in the near future.

“We are thrilled to partner with a world-class city like Seattle,” said TransitScreen COO Ryan Croft. “Together with SDOT, we want to make it easy for locals and visitors to move safely around the city by providing a complete picture of their multimodal options.”

The pilot public/private partnership program will install ten screens at citywide locations, such as building lobbies or ground level windows, where they can be seen by large numbers of viewers. SDOT invites buildings or business owners/managers with suitable locations to partner in hosting a TransitScreen. The Hines Company’s Bank of America building, located at 800 Fifth Avenue in Seattle, is the first location to be selected for this new program.

“Providing real time, accessible transit information in buildings will empower employees to make smart commute decisions,” said Jessica Szelag, executive director of Commute Seattle. “We are excited for the opportunity that SDOT has created for downtown properties.”

The first 10 sites with appropriate locations that demonstrate interest and a willingness to pay for installation will be selected. TransitScreen will donate the screens, and SDOT will pay for the software design and the first year of maintenance.

SDOT also proposes to extend this partnership opportunity to ten additional sites in 2015 and pay fifty percent of the total cost of the service.

TransitScreen is currently available in other North American cities including San Francisco, Washington DC, Boston, New York City, Chicago and Toronto. More information about TransitScreen service can be found here: http://transitscreen.com.

Thinking Cities
By Thinking Cities November 11, 2014 10:08